After Nightfall Season 2, Episode 4

We are officially halfway through the season. Have we all taken a deep breath after last night’s episode? Good. Because holy hell, was that dramatic.

Let’s begin with the elephant in the room. Colin. Specifically, his encounter with Quintin and Dave. Oh Colin, why?

“I wish it was you instead of Troy!”

The entire scene leading up to that explosion, I was suspecting Colin may say something to that effect. But all the same I was going “Don’t say it. Don’t say it.” And he said it. I don’t blame Quintin for reacting the way he did. And I never thought I’d see the day, but I’m with Dave when he says “What the fuck is wrong with you?”
This isn’t like the unforgivable scene from The Cursed Child where something very similar is said between a parent and child and it’s completely out of nowhere and out of character. I don’t like what Colin says to his son, but this scene actually works. Even leaving aside the impressive performances, this argument is justified, and Quintin isn’t exactly innocent either. He doesn’t deserve to hear what he hears from Colin, but he fans the flames.
At acting school, one of the best teachers/directors/performers in the business told my class, If something is well written, none of the characters are completely right. What does this mean in terms of our scene? Well, obviously Colin is very wrong for wishing Quintin had been murdered and saying it to his face. But Quintin is wrong for a) saying he wishes Colin wasn’t his father and b) continuing to work with Dave. And of course Dave is a criminal, but in this case he’s actually the voice of reason. I’m glad this scene was added because Colin is far from a saint. He’s a very grief-stricken man, but he’s completely absorbed in his own world. He seems to have forgotten he’s not the only one suffering because of Troy. Yes, emotions are all over the place but come on, Colin.
Let’s just forget for a moment that either Quintin or Dave could have killed Troy. Dave rightly points out Quintin has lost his brother. Troy was more than just Colin’s son. And this is something we’ve seen already with Justine (and has he even talked to Isobel about it?), which is further cemented when Colin goes into the house only to find Brenda.

It seems I was correct in my theory that Brenda is a fraud. Yay. Colin is completely justified in his anger towards her, because scammers like Brenda do exist especially in high-profile cases. They take advantage of desperate families so it was great to see her thrown out the way she was. Full props to actor Felicity Burke for selling the character so well.
But in saying that, I feel for Justine here (although I’m at a loss to why she was seemingly open to Brenda’s claims while dismissing her husband’s!). She’s trying to find something to cling to, anything at all, and Colin’s sole focus is finding Troy’s killer. Again, a completely understandable goal. But at the expense of neglecting your family’s feelings? That’s where the shades of grey come in. Good to know Colin isn’t going to be portrayed as some kind of Messiah figure.

Ok, ok, I’ve spent enough time on the first three minutes and forty seconds. Moving on to the next act. Zara is out for a jog and runs into Ursula and Viv. And do I detect the hints of a spark between the local tarot reader and the new sergeant? We know Zara recently ended a relationship, we know she’s of the LGBTQIA community, and there’s been no mention of Ursula’s sexuality (not that this has any bearing on whether the character is good or not). Could this be leading to something more? Though ethically, it would be a tricky subject. Conflict of interest and all.

Meanwhile we see Ryan has returned (somehow injury-free despite Leanne saying Dave nearly killed him) and wants Leanne to join him in his new life. But Leanne is afraid for hers if she left Dave. Definitely true for many people in violent relationships. Though we’ve never seen Leanne in any kind of physical danger from Dave, it’s not too much of a stretch to imagine him going there. We’ve seen his temper in action. I may loathe cheaters, both in the real and fictional world, but I have to admit, there was a twinge of sympathy for her here. This storyline is definitely going to have an explosive climax.

At the hospital, Faye’s claim that she doesn’t remember her attack isn’t fooling anybody, least of all Angela. But Kobie now knows what Oscar has done. I’m not sure Oscar is going to get out of this season alive now. No joke. Also, that baby was adorable.

On the way to school the next day, Hayden confronts Wesley over his injuries. Wesley claims it was a bike accident, but Hayden doesn’t believe this. Since Wesley hasn’t been at school since the accident, the day Troy was murdered, it’s obvious he thinks they’re from Troy defending himself.
Nice and realistic touch, but Wesley has only just been introduced this season. He was never even mentioned throughout season 1. To have Wesley be the killer would be a stretch of Elastigirl proportions, plus Wayne Tunks has gone on the record saying the killer played Season 1 knowing they did it. My hope is that if this is a red herring, and I’m 110% sure it is, Wesley serves a greater purpose than just someone for Hayden to suspect. I don’t believe his wounds were from stacking it on his bike at all. I still think Kobie was involved in that because of the blood soaked shirt from Season 1.

Finally, we’re back at conversion camp where Nathan’s parents have been brought in for family counselling. Nathan’s told he’s nowhere near being cured, but if I had to hazard a guess, it seems Pat might not be as big on this idea as Ed. She’s clearly upset at her son’s sexuality, but her reaction when Nathan was abducted in Season 1 adds some weight to the idea that she isn’t entirely without reason. She shows concern when Nathan tells them about the shock therapy and Daisy’s situation, and the fact that Peter and Melinda don’t immediately deny this should raise a red flag. But then again, if she’s ok to send Nathan to conversion therapy at all there’s not a lot she can do to redeem herself. As for Ed, he’s a lost cause. I don’t care if he turns out to be Jesus. Nothing is ever going to make me like his character.
And if anybody is interested as to why I’m so fixated on Nathan and his storyline, I’ll reveal something without naming names. Nathan reminds me of someone very dear to me. My best friend in high school, who I’m still very close with, was very nearly sent to one of these horrendous places after his parents discovered he was gay by going through his phone. Thankfully he wasn’t, but it was a terrifying two weeks of not being able to contact him in any way. So that’s why Nathan evokes such strong reactions with me.

This episode feels different. There’s a spark in terms of the drama, and a shift that things are only going to get more crazy from here. The fire has been lit. Let’s see how much it will burn. Though if I’m honest, the only thing I want to see burn down is that camp.

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